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    Adjusting to fluctuating temperatures

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories The duration of the vegetation period – i.e. the time that elapses between leafing out (the emergence of the first leaf) in spring and the initiation of leaf loss in autumn – is a highly significant ecological parameter that has a considerable influence on both plant productivity and the biogeochemical cycling of vital nutrients in ecosystems. However, the mechanisms that determine the length of the vegetation period for any given species are poorly understood. Hence, in order to assess the potential impact of global climate change on plant productivity, for instance, more information on the timing of the growing seasons of a wide range of plant species is required. In a large-scale study, LMU botany professor Susanne Renner and her colleague Constantin Zohner have now measured this parameter for a large sample of woody plant species from the Northern hemisphere. Their findings, which have now been published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, reveal significant differences between species that are native to North America on the one hand, and European and East Asian trees and shrubs on the other. [...]

    Saving amphibians from a deadly fungus means acting without knowing all the answers

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories The calls of frogs on warm nights in the spring are a welcome sound, telling listeners that the seasons are changing and summer is coming. Today, however, ponds that once echoed with the chirps, chuckles and calls of frogs and toads are falling silent … [...]

    Perth’s urban sprawl affecting sex life of plants

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories A Perth researcher is using CSI-style paternity testing in the lab to track pollen and measure how much the urban sprawl is affecting plants ability to reproduce. [...]

    Wildlife pays the price of Kenya’s illegal grazing

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories “It’s devastating. I’ve been following them every day of my life for the last year,” said Dedan Ngatia, a wild dog researcher in Kenya’s central Laikipia region. “They’re all dead.” [...]

    A study switches from genetic to metabolic analysis to reconstitute evolutionary process

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories With 72 species currently identified, Espeletia is a plant genus endemic to the paramo, a moist alpine biome unique to the northern Andes. This genus, which inhabits the world’s most diverse high-altitude ecosystem, is an outstanding example of adaptiv… [...]

    Casting into the past helps reveal fishing’s future

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories Intensive fishing and climate change pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity in the world’s oceans, but reconstructing how the past 500 years of human activity on the seas has transformed marine life could help to reveal what the future holds bene… [...]

    California condor takes flight in wild after near extinction

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories In a remote, rugged valley overlooking the Pacific Ocean, researchers closely monitor an endangered icon: the California condor. [...]

    Foundation to create special reserve for albino orangutan

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories A conservation group in Indonesia says it wants to create a 5-hectare “forest island” for the world’s only known albino orangutan after rescuing it from villagers earlier this year. [...]

    Could condors return to northern California?

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories In 2003, Northern California’s Yurok Tribe initiated efforts to reintroduce California Condors on their lands. While wild condors have not existed in the region for more than a hundred years, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications sug… [...]

    Western cities try to stop hungry bears from causing havoc

    Original @ Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking for knocked-over trash cans. She drove her car slowly through alleyways on the west side of this Colorado city, close to where streets end and the Rocky Mountains b… [...]